Behind the Wheel of Driving Miss Daisy

During the past year I have been a volunteer at the Ottawa Little Theatre (OLT) as a historical consultant. For their recent production of Driving Miss Daisy I created a presentation for the cast and production team on the history between the Black and Jewish communities in Atlanta, Georgia. Last week I was a part of a panel for an OLT talk back session for the play. Below are some pictures from the production, and (here Behind the Wheel of Driving Miss Daisy) are some slides from my presentation.

 

Crash Course World History: Ancient Egypt

The Crash Course youtube series was recently recommended to me by a blog reader (thanks Matt!), so here it is for your enjoyment! The voices behind the series, John Green and Hank Green, record info videos on a variety of subjects, including Psychology, Literature, World History, Chemistry, and much more. Along with being knowledgeable, the videos have some great infographics.

The video below is on Ancient Egypt. Take a look!

Yee-haw! The history of the Calgary Stampede, the greatest outdoor show on earth

I’ll be attending this year’s Calgary Stampede, which kicks off this weekend (as the name suggests) in Calgary, Alberta.

For those curious about “The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth” (which is the Stampede’s official slogan), watch this video created for the 100th year anniversary in 2012. Also check out archival photos of the stampede below, curtosey of the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee.

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

From the Calgary Stampede Historical Committee

Rumoured beer tunnel uncovered by Albert Street construction

Ottawa Citizen

Construction crews on Albert Street have unearthed a mysterious opening that may be the entrance to a long-rumoured “beer tunnel” that has beguiled Ottawa’s historians for years.

Now those same historians are worried that the current sewer work could destroy an important part of the city’s heritage.

It’s “a piece of Ottawa history that’s being torn apart,” said Andrew King, an Ottawa artist and amateur historian who has researched the tunnels.

Photos taken by the City of Ottawa were posted Wednesday on Ottawa’s West Side Action, a blog on urban development issues by activist Eric Darwin. The photos show a concrete tunnel full of water with an entrance sloping down into the ground.

It could be one of two tunnels rumoured to exist near LeBreton Flats, which was the site of Ottawa’s main trainyard until the mid-60s.

In the 1940s a major brewing operation, Brading’s Capital Brewery Ltd., straddled what is now Albert Street.

The…

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Canadian “Liberty Bell” returned home

Canadian Perspective

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An artifact from the ship that served as a major backdrop in the negotiations that led to the birth of Canada is about to return home.  A bronze bell from the S.S. Queen Victoria is one of the few artifacts salvaged from the steamship which sank off the coast of North Carolina, two years after the vessel ferried the Fathers of Confederation to the Charlottetown Conference in 1864.

The artifact described as “Canada’s version of the Liberty Bell” will be on display in the Canadian Museum of History, Ottawa ON, to be a part of the exhibit to mark the 150th anniversary of the events leading up to Confederation in 1867.

The Queen Victoria transported John A. MacDonald, George Brown and George Etienne Cartier and other members of the Canada delegation to Charlottetown on Aug. 31, 1864 and served as their accomodations for the conference.

The bell has been in…

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